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Volatility returned to markets this week as the US S&P 500 fell by more than 1% on Tuesday, the sharpest fall since October of last year. The selloff was triggered by the financial sector which fell 2.5%. Safe-haven assets including US Treasuries and gold rallied in response. The fall reverberated around the globe with most equity markets ending the week in negative territory...
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With over 25 years experience, private banking veteran Paul Allen joins GWM Investment Management as executive director and will have both private client and management responsibilities at the firm.
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The week began with markets mulling over last Friday’s US non-farm payrolls data, with the number of new jobs having been created strongly exceeding expectations. However, this was countered by the annual pace of average earnings having slowed to 2.5%, from 2.8% in December, and the overall level of unemployment unexpectedly rising to 4.8%.
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Against a backdrop of Brexit and US Presidential uncertainty, Guardian Wealth Management enjoyed unprecedented growth in 2016 with revenues increasing by over 25% from 2015 and Adviser numbers increasing by more than...
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Markets ended on a stronger note after a cautious start to the week. Once again investor sentiment continues to be dictated by the new US president, Donald Trump, who gave the thumbs up to two new oil pipelines, which gives a promising...
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Global markets were rather mixed this week, as doubts continue to linger over the prospects of a Trump driven reflation trade.
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Global markets briefly lost ground this week, prompted by the U.S. President-elect’s much anticipated press conference on Wednesday.
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After the successful launch of its first sovereign bond sale back in October last year, Saudi Arabia is set to launch a second issue as early as February.
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Sterling fell to its lowest level since October against the dollar after Prime Minister Theresa May dismissed the idea of the UK retaining bits of its European Union membership, indicating a ‘hard Brexit’ approach.
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The new year started very much in the same vein as where it had left off, with the dollar strengthening, stock markets testing new highs and government bonds selling off.
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The FTSE 100 began 2017 by hitting a record high 7,205.21.00 points before closing lower at 7,177.89 while Hong Kong and European markets also enjoyed positive starts to the new year.
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Darren Jones, the former head of international technical sales at Old Mutual International, has joined Guardian Wealth Management’s senior management team as technical and training director.
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GWM Group has today announced the appointment of Mike Coady as Chief Commercial Officer with immediate effect. Mike will be tasked with driving the global expansion of the GWM Group, as the company builds upon its position as one of the leading expatriate financial advisory organisations.
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Markets this week were dominated by the Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee meeting where as expected, US interest rates were raised by 0.25% for only the second time in over a decade, taking US rates to 0.75%.
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Equity markets performed very strongly this week, as investors continued to focus on the positives of a Trump presidency,anticipating a faster growing economy driven by infrastructure expenditure and a lighter touch regulatory environment.
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Most equity and bond markets retreated over the week due to rising interest rate expectations.
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The US equity market continued to hit new highs over the week in the wake of the election of Donald Trump as president, elevating expectations for the US economy to receive a boost to growth through infrastructure spending.
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Yesterday the UK Chancellor Phillip Hammond took to the dispatch box for the first major fiscal event since the EU Referendum in June.
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Markets were a little more reflective this week after the unexpected election of Donald Trump as President of the United States of America.
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With all the bluster of campaigning now a distant memory, the world is now seeing a somewhat different Donald Trump.
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After a campaign that has lasted for almost twenty months from the start of the US primaries, and one in which the polls predicted a win for Hillary Clinton, billionaire Donald Trump, the man with no political experience whatsoever, won the US presidential election as the rural vote came out in force.
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Equity and bond markets lost ground this week as investor nervousness over the US election builds.
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Today the High Court has ruled that the Government must have parliamentary approval prior to triggering Article 50 which formally begin the process of the UK leaving the European Union.
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The week started positively for equity markets with U.S. stocks touching their highest levels in two weeks as a flurry of deal activity and strong quarterly earnings boosted investor confidence.
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Markets got off to a weak start as investors waited for further company earnings data and the European Central Bank’s (ECB) latest monetary policy decision on Thursday. As the week progressed positive earnings data from US companies and stabilising Chinese data helped propel markets higher. As of 12pm London time, the S&P 500 was up 0.39%, FTSE All Share 0.42%, Eurostoxx 600 1.47%, Japanese Topix 1.34% and the MSCI Emerging Markets index 1.82%, aided by the US dollar coming off its recent highs.
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The week began with a significant rally in European stock markets triggered by a jump in crude oil prices following an indication from Russia that they will join Saudi Arabia and freeze output.
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Markets were dominated by thoughts over the next US interest rate hike and Sterling plunging on the back of a speech made by the UK’s Prime Minister, Theresa May, pointing towards “hard Brexit”.
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Most equity markets sold off over the week as financials struggled after the US Department of Justice requested $14bn from Deutsche Bank to settle the miss-selling of mortgage securities.
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Global Markets recorded a week of very strong gains across all major markets. Markets reacted positively to the Bank of Japan’s announcement on Wednesday that it would keep its key interest rate steady at -0.1%
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Markets seesawed over the week as investors thoughts were once again dominated by concerns over US interest rate policy. Despite weak economic data out of the US last week, a speech by Eric Rosengren, President of the Boston Fed, put investors on alert as he warned that the US economy could over heat if interest rates were kept too low, leading to a sharp selloff last Friday.
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Global markets recorded a mixed week of returns with strong gains from Emerging markets and Europe but softer returns from the US and the UK. Market returns were largely driven by a disappointing batch of US employment data which lowered the possibility of a US September interest rate hike by the Fed.
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Markets have been digesting Janet Yellen’s (chairperson of the US Federal Reserve) comments over the week after she confirmed that the case for a further US interest rate rise had indeed strengthened.
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In a very quiet week for financial markets, with thin volumes traded, most equity markets were down over the week as investors wait for Janet Yellen’s speech, Chairperson of the US Federal Reserve, at the Jackson Hole Symposium on Friday, looking for clues as to the future path of US interest rates.
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During a very quiet week, equity markets initially continued their climb as weak inflation and retail sales data out of the US released last Friday reduced market expectations for a September US interest rate rise. All three US indices hit record highs by the close on Monday, with the S&P 500 returning 8.6% for the year to date.
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Global markets recorded a week of strong gains driven largely by positive data out of the U.S. Better than expected U.S. labour market data last Friday and strong earnings from major US department stores on Thursday buoyed investor sentiment and underlines the view that the US economy retains resilience. As a result, all three major U.S. stock indexes closed at record highs on Thursday for the first time since 1999 with the S&P 500 ending the week up 0.1%, experiencing only a brief stutter on Wednesday when productivity data released out of the U.S. was somewhat anaemic.
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Markets started the week off cautiously as mixed global manufacturing data, weakening oil prices and uncertainty over central bank policy following investors heightened expectations having been dashed by the relative inaction of the Bank of Japan the week before.
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The Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) has voted to cut interest rates to 0.25% and introduced a package of commitments to stimulate the UK economy post-Brexit vote after data raised concerns that Britain is heading for recession.
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Global markets recorded another week of modest gains in a week dominated by risk events in the form of policy announcements by the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) and the Bank of Japan (BoJ) Monetary Policy Committee.
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The global markets recorded modest gains at the start of the new week with the impact of Turkey’s failed coup attempt last Friday seeming to have limited impact; global stocks hit 2016 highs as geopolitical angst was seen as encouraging central banks to continue their ultra-accommodative monetary policies while equity bulls are energised by earnings reports and news of a mammoth bid for ARM Holdings by giant Japanese corporation SoftBank. Emerging market stocks looked poised for their best month since March and favourable results from the likes of Microsoft, Morgan Stanley and Abbot Laboratories aided the S&P 500 and Nasdaq in advancing.
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This week has seen an across the board ‘risk on’ rally as equity markets globally have risen, although there has been some softening in the UK and European markets this morning following the horrific events in Nice last night. The increased level of volatility that has followed the UK’s Brexit vote translated into large price movements in a number of assets classes, with many being the largest movements for many months or even years.
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The impact of Brexit continues to dominate markets this week, with prices recalibrating as the impact on the global economy is reassessed. For the moment, markets are inclined to believe that the Brexit vote will impact the UK predominantly, with some negative consequences for Europe. The further you are away from the epicentre, the less the impact is perceived to be, with global growth now expected to be only mildly impacted
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All eyes have been focused on the aftermath of the UK’s Brexit vote this week as investors have scrambled to try and understand the potential implications for the global economy. We commented in last week’s note how the week had been broken into 2 parts: the 4 days running up to the referendum and the 1 day after it. Somewhat surprisingly given the result, this week has proven to be the mirror opposite.
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They say a week is a long time in politics, over the past seven days an hour has felt like a week and some days have seen more activity than an entire political term. So now the dust has settled after last week’s Brexit result and the markets are starting to show signs of recovery, we thought it was worthwhile recapping how the outcome has affected the political landscape in the UK and beyond.
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The week to date as at 12 p.m. (GMT). Brexit: the decision The week has been very clearly split into 2 parts: the 4 days leading up to the announcement of the result of the UK’s referendum on EU membership and today, which is turning out to be ‘the morning after the night before’ for many investors.
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It has been a busy week for markets and, whilst the issues driving them are the same ones that we have noted in recent weeks, some market movements have been sizeable. However, the shocking and tragic events in Birstall yesterday have put everything into stark perspective and are a reminder that there are more important issues in life than asset prices and currency movements.
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Equity markets started the week positively, rising as energy shares rallied and statements from the Federal Reserve (Fed) reassured investors that rate rises will not be too early or too aggressive.
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With less than one month to go and both sides ramping up their campaigns, there are valid (and tenuous) arguments being put forward by both camps in preparation for what could be the biggest shakeup of UK and EU politics, in decades. Whilst we are not voicing a preference for one side over the other, we discuss the key economic factors that could influence voters' decisions.
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Equity markets are having a mixed week as data continues to be contradictory and a number of geographically specific factors have come into play. As a result, whilst last week markets went up in unison, this week returns have been disparate.
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Equity markets across the globe have been enjoying a positive week, led by China and Europe with the Hang Seng and Euro Stoxx 50 posting gains of 4.0% and 3.9% respectively to noon Friday.
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Performance across equity markets was mixed as investors repriced the potential for a June/July US interest rate hike following the release of the April US Federal Reserve minutes. The minutes suggested that a rate hike is still very much a possibility should employment and inflation data continue to strengthen. Futures markets repriced the probability of such a move from 4% at the beginning of the week to a 30% chance by the end, and a 51% chance of a move by the July meeting, post the UK’s EU referendum.
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It was a mixed week for equity markets. Despite the continued appreciation in the oil price, with Brent crude hitting a six month high, the US dollar continued to strengthen, supported by robust US retail sales figures on Friday, keeping the possibility of a July interest rate rise alive. The S&P 500 fell 0.44%, MSCI Emerging Markets index also fell 0.54% negatively impacted by the strength of the dollar, as was Gold, falling 1.32% over the week
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Equity markets were down due to weak US and Chinese macro data and disappointing earnings results, particularly from European bank stocks. The S&P 500 fell 0.33%, MSCI Europe ex UK -2.48%, MSCI United Kingdom -1.80%, Nikkei 225 -3.36%, and MSCI Emerging Markets -2.76%. Brent Crude oil also fell 4.22% closing the week at $45.37 a barrel, whilst the Gold price closed broadly flat at $1,287.72, having broken through $1,300 earlier in the week, the first time since January 2015.
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Equity markets retreated following a week of inaction from central bankers and poor earnings results in the US. The US dollar continued to weaken, having fallen over 6% versus a basket of currencies since the start of the year which helped to further boost the oil price, closing at $48.13 dollars for Brent oil, a rise of 72% since the January lows.
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Markets made further progress as the oil price continued to strengthen despite no agreement to a production freeze having been reached between the major oil producing countries at Doha. Brent crude closed the week at $45.11. The Japanese Nikkei 225 rose 4.30% in local currency terms, spurred on by a weakening Yen ahead of this Thursday’s Bank of Japan (BoJ) policy meeting, whilst the S&P 500 rose 0.53% and MSCI Europe ex UK rose 1.82%.
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Markets had their best week for the year driven by encouraging Chinese economic data combined with continued US dollar weakness and a rising oil price, providing an improving picture for the global economy. The Japanese Nikkei 225 had a particularly strong week, rising 6.17% in US dollar terms as it bounced strongly from an oversold position and rising expectations of further stimulus from the Bank of Japan at its 28th April meeting.
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According to the leaked documents, Mossack Fonseca have worked with individuals or companies ranging from FIFA presidents, drug barons and friends of presidents and in some instances they have continued to assist existing clients after they were placed under sanctions by the US Treasury.
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Markets were mixed with the most significant news being the continued rapid appreciation of the Japanese Yen versus the US dollar which rose almost 3½ percent in one week alone.
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Markets had a mixed week as Janet Yellen, chairperson of the US Federal Reserve dampened down expectations of an April US interest rate rise citing the limited firepower available to central banks should they kill off the recovery early.
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Global equities dipped as five members of the US Federal Reserve's rate-setting committee suggested that a rate hike could come as early as April. Federal funds futures are currently pricing in a rate hike in late 2016 to early 2017.
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An evening filled to the brim with laughs and sporting banter?
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British expats are seeing their options for pension scheme investments diminish.
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Regular round-ups of the Rugby World Cup 2015
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Raising interest rates may be a positive signal
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The recent two days have been a jolt for equity markets
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Expats from Hong Kong and the United Arab Emirates keep shunning advice.
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One thing you come to expect in the finance industry is change.
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The Geneva team plan to continue holding seminars and we will keep you updated so you can go along and pick the brain s of the proffessionals.
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Very shortly, members of private pensions will be able to enter flexible drawdown.
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As international advisors it goes without saying that we work with people who are used to being globally mobile.
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a totally unprecedented event with the implications as yet unknown
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As part of the ongoing GWM Group growth strategy, Chris Payne, ex Aspinalls will head up a new FCA authorised division namely GWM Investment Management based in Mayfair London.
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The legal dispute over how Brexit must be authorised comes before the Supreme Court this week with the UK's biggest constitutional case in decades set to decide how the government can begin the process exiting the European Union.
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Italian banking shares suffered hefty losses after Matteo Renzi’s heavy constitutional referendum defeat revived fresh concerns about the fragility of the country’s financial system.
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The positive afterglow markets have enjoyed since the US election, lost some of its sheen this week as Donald Trump issued an executive order over the weekend banning travel from seven Muslim majority nations.
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The majority of global markets rallied this week, underpinned by robust economic data as well as a resurgence in the ‘reflation trade’. President trump gave reassurances over his plans for a ‘phenomenal’ tax plan, which helped drive investor sentiment to new highs...
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World equity markets in aggregate continued to climb last week, led by the US with the Dow Jones Industrial average closing at an another record high on Thursday, whilst the S&P 500 was only a fraction beneath its highest level ever.
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Economic data during the week was generally positive. In a raft of mid-week data, a rise in Eurozone Manufacturing PMI to 55.4, its highest level since 2011, showed continuing and accelerating expansion and was accompanied by strong data on German wages and seasonally-adjusted employment for January, up 2.0% and 58,000 respectively.
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It has been a week of diverging fortunes as markets reacted in differing ways to increased expectations of a US interest rate rise in March, mixed in with North Korea firing 4 ballistic missiles into the Sea of Japan, President Trump accusing Obama of wiretapping, a more confident European Central Bank and an unexpectedly sharp rise in US oil inventories.
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3 dominant factors held sway over investment markets this week: the US Federal Reserve Open Market Committee meeting, with markets already pricing in a rate rise of 0.25%, but more significantly, looking for a steer on the future path of rate rises; the Dutch general election, not as significant to markets in itself, but acts as a gauge as to the rise in popularity of populist political parties ahead of the upcoming French presidential election; and the oil price which fell 8% last week on concerns that OPEC’s (Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) supply restrictions are being swamped by the effect of US tight oil coming back on stream.
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